Material Text Cultures
Subprojects
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C05

Inscriptionality. Reflections of Material Text Culture in the Literature of the 12th to 17th Centuries

 

current staff members

Teilprojektleiter Prof. Dr. Ludger Lieb
akademische Mitarbeiterin Laura Velte
akademischer Mitarbeiter Dennis Disselhoff M.A.

former staff members

akademischer Mitarbeiter Frank Krabbes
akademische Mitarbeiterin Dr. Astrid Lembke
akademischer Mitarbeiter Dr. Michael R. Ott
weitere Mitarbeiterin Ricarda Wagner

 

 

 


Database: https://inschriftlichkeit.materiale-textkulturen.de/
 

The sub-project C05 investigates representations of script-bearing artefacts in medieval literature. Given that the Middle Ages are an era in which writing tends to be associated primarily with the manuscript, we are interested in discovering alternative places and materials where writing might be featured or imagined. Our main focus is on fictional inscriptions which appear in literary fiction from the 12th to the 17th century. These inscriptions are often quite fanciful and highly symbolic. They can by very long, extremely valuable, elaborately manufactured, or even magical. One basic assumption of the sub-project is that these extraordinary forms of writing reveal and represent not only knowledge of practices and conditions of writing, but also theorize the potentials and boundaries of writing itself. Thus, one of the main goals of the sub-project C05 is to reconstruct a Medieval and Early Modern ‘discourse of inscriptionality‘ in order to provide insight into Medieval textuality more generally. Video: 3-Minuten Wissenschaft. Der Apfel der Diskordia, Michael R. Ott

According to our understanding inscriptions can be several things. First of all, we are interested in examples of inscriptions which break the surface of the material artefact, such as an epitaph chiseled into a gravestone. Furthermore, inscriptions can appear on materials not conventionally expected to carry text, such as jewels, metal, textiles and the like. Finally, we are focused on material artefacts that distinctively relate to the written texts they bear. This is true for unique or exceptional objects (i.e. the costly manufactured dog lead in Wolfram von Eschenbach’s “Titurel“ or the magical apple of Discordia in Konrad von Würzburg’s “Trojan War“); for artefacts whose inscriptions determine the identity of a protagonist (such as the tablet in Hartmann von Aue’s “Gregorius“ or the inscription on Roland's helmet in the “Song of Roland“); but also extends to 17th century inscriptions in trees, a convention important for the production and reception of poetry within the framework of “Pastoral Literature.“

As a basis for our research, we systematically collect references to narrated inscriptions in Medieval literature from the 12th to 17th centuries with regard to their materiality. The references are accessible in an online-database: https://inschriftlichkeit.materiale-textkulturen.de. A working bibliography (as of 21st November 2019, Link) provides information on research literature relevant to the project. In the third funding period, the subproject’s members of staff intend to augment the database with further references, especially from Medieval Latin and Old French literature, and to bring it to a conclusion in that it becomes permanently available to the scientific community. In addition, we plan to bring together the cultural-historical, textual-anthropological and narratological aspects of inscriptionality in a final publication. To this effect, particularly two dimensions of inscriptions still need to be examined in greater depth: the relationship between real (recorded) and fictional (narrated) inscriptions (working domain of Laura Velte) as well as narrated inscriptions from the transitional period between the 15th and 17th centuries (doctoral thesis of Dennis Disselhoff).

First Funding Period (2011–2015)

One of the main goals of the sub-project C05 during the first funding period was the database-assisted gathering, documentation and systematic description of sources found in German literature from the 12th to the 17th century as well as the development of a suitable database.

In addition to developing the database, our initial research phase explored the potential applications of the data we gathered in terms of media and cultural studies. Our research results are being disseminated in a variety of scholarly formats. First of all there are two monographs: one pursuing an interest in metafictional poetics (Astrid Lembke’s habilitation), the other, investigating gift-giving and exchange practices (Frank Krabbes’s dissertation). Furthermore, the results have been discussed in a variety of scholarly articles and presentations, which can be found in the bibliography below. Some of the questions that have emerged in these scholarly investigations include:

  • What role does mobility or immobility play in the function(s) of a script-bearing artefact?
  • How can a mobile script-bearing artefact communicate and extend the identity of a protagonist?
  • How can be we benefit from the concept of the „interface“ when looking at complex relations between recipients (or a network of recipients) and script-bearing artefacts?
  • What might we discover by exploring the relationships between narratively imagined inscribed objects in medieval texts and actual inscriptions in historical medieval environments? This question offers an opportunity to reflect on the historical dimensions of our discipline in order to recuperate a missed opportunity by German philology to broaden its subject area through a reconfiguration of the relationship between a philology dealing with the text and a philology dealing with the matter.
  • How can Actor-Network Theory be applied to a specific script-bearing artefact?
  • How can fictional inscriptions become significant for a particular literary genre?
  • How do epitaphs act as permanent, effective artefacts that generate presence and stimulate communication and actions?

     

Second Funding Period (2015–2019)

 While in the first funding period we especially paid attention to inscriptions within German courtly literature, we aimed to expand our focus to other Medieval European literatures (Old and Middle English, Old Norse, Old French, Old Iberian, Old Italian) in the second funding period. In collaboration with international external scholars we composed an anthology that for the first time takes into account the European dimension of text-immanent inscriptionality in Medieval literature: Writing beyond Pen and Parchment: Inscribed Objects in Medieval European Literature, ed. by Ricarda Wagner, Christine Neufeld and Ludger Lieb, published in November 2019 as volume 30 within the CRC’s series “Material Text Cultures”.

The European framework was also considered in Laura Velte’s doctoral thesis. Taking the (late) ancient tradition of literary epitaphs as a starting point Velte inquires after the semiotic and narrative functions of tombs in Medieval literature. Michael Ott’s postdoctoral thesis explores a theoretical approach that takes an interest in the history of medieval studies as a scientific discipline. Among other things, he addresses the question why German medieval studies have thus far never paid any notable attention to the materiality and presence of inscribed artefacts in the Middle Ages.

Doctoral Thesis of Laura Velte

Laura Velte’s doctoral thesis (‚Sepulchral Semiotics. Traditions and Functions of the Sepulchral Inscription in Medieval European Literature‘, completed since November 2018) is devoted to the large corpus of narrated grave inscriptions in the Middle Ages.  On the basis of Medieval German and European literature Laura Velte develops a semiotics of the Sepulchral. She conceives of grave inscriptions as a cultural practice of dissolving boundaries by which a deceased is intended to be permanently inscribed into the world, something that is already expressed by choosing particularly robust memorial materials such as stone or metal. While the tomb spatially substitutes the absent body (principle of contiguity), the writing preserves the person’s specific characteristics beyond death (principle of identification). In this process, the writing becomes the reader’s interpretant of the material substitute. Against this backdrop, Laura Velte investigates the possibilities and range of telling of tombs and grave inscriptions in the vernacular literature from the 12th and 13th centuries (with an emphasis on the German courtly romance). To this end, she first examines the traditions that shaped the narrations of tombs in the High Middle Ages. After providing an overview of manuscript collections of real as well as fictional grave inscriptions, she focuses on epitaphs in biographies, saints’ lives, epics and historiographical writing within the Latin scholarly discourse of the Early and High Middle Ages. Paradigmatically she shows that grave inscriptions a) serve as major components within a narrative, organising longer texts in formal terms (right up to the layout surface), marking sequence transitions and conclusions and contextualising the narration according to salvation history; b) as transgeneric elements are a popular place for intertextuality and c) exhibit a conspicuous tendency towards self-reference, problematising themselves and their own materiality in order to allow the spatiotemporal range of real epitaphs to compete with fictional ones. The analysis then focuses on vernacular European romances of the 12th and 13th centuries, with particular attention being paid to the narrative, semantic and metapoetic functions of narrated inscriptions. Here, Velte stresses the display of genealogy and historical teleology in the ekphrastic grave inscriptions of ancient romances (Troy, Aeneas, Alexander) and the pagan epitaphs of courtly romances (‘Parzival’, ‘Wigalois’, ‘Flore und Blanscheflur’) which are further characterised by exhibiting cultural contrasts and an increase in inscriptional ‘balancing‘. She further perceives an epitaphic ‘condensation’ in the Arthurian prose romance (‘Prosalancelot’), which may be considered as simulating a chronical mode of narration.

Postdoctoral Thesis of Michael R. Ott

Under the label ‘Textual sciences’ (‘German Studies and their Middle Ages. Textual-Scientific Interventions’), Michael R. Ott, member of the subproject from 2013–2019, examines some of the disciplinary decisions that have led to the fact that German medieval studies have very much neglected the materiality and presence of inscribed artefacts in the past. The disciplinary-historical perspective of the postdoctoral thesis (completed in 2018) provides for a self-reflection in the history of the humanities, as prominently demonstrated by Bruno Latour before. The perspectives and results of the work correspond with the thematic framework of the CRC 933 in many respects: For instance, Michael R. Ott replaces the common orientation towards a selective critical reading of the ‘Nibelungenlied’ with a synoptic one; as a substitute for a–from a material point of view–ill-founded division of medieval poetry into ‘Minnesang’ and ‘Sangspruchdichtung’ he gives priority to the ‘Political within Poetry‘. Instead of assigning the medieval texts either to the field of historical science or German studies, Ott promotes the possibility of a third way between the disciplines; to escape the long-standing discussion concerning fictionality and factuality, he centres his argument on the ‘narrative worlds’ of the texts that proved to be a much more relevant factor for the textual practices of contemporary recipients and producers. Introducing concepts such as ‘Urkundlichkeit’ (‘documentariness’) and ‘Inschriftlichkeit’ (‘inscriptionality’) Ott confronts older discussions on reading and writing, orality/literacy as well as relations of image and text; instead of tree diagrams and collections of documents he uses network diagrams in order to visualise the complexity of textual culture of the High Middle Ages more adequately and accessibly for the modern reader. Taking all these arguments into account, the thesis advocates a new, text-scientific approach within German medieval studies that draws on the perspectives, concepts and theories of the CRC 933.

Postdoctoral Thesis of Astrid Lembke

In her postdoctoral thesis (,Inscriptionality and Literary Theory. The Intratextual Poetics of Medieval Romances’, completed in 2018), Astrid Lembke (member of the subproject in 2011/12) pursues the idea that medieval authors of courtly romances not only design literary theoretical programmes in their prologues—a viewpoint adopted in Walter Haug’s programmatic study on ‘Literary Theory in the German Middle Ages’—, but also on the level of the narratives’ plot. Often, the stylistic fabric and effect of medieval narrative literature is demonstrated by showcasing objects that form part of the narrated world. In his study on medieval ekphrasis, Haiko Wandhoff illustrated how descriptions of art and architecture point to the poetics of the texts in which they are embedded in the sense of ‘mise en abyme’, thus forming a key to the interpretation of the text as a whole. Against the backdrop of Wandhoff’s approach, Lembke looks at narrated inscriptions in a similar way. On the basis of such “texts within the text” (‘meta-texts’) medieval authors discuss how and under which circumstances it is possible to create meaningful contexts by writing.

Lembke’s interest lies in creating a new poetological model of the courtly romance by reconstructing the semiotic, narratological, performative and poetological operations put forward in the medieval texts by means of narrated inscriptions. She conceives of these fictional inscriptions  as independent texts, relating to the surrounding narrative in terms of their content and materiality. In this way, Lembke offers an interpretation especially on the poetological self-understanding of the medieval authors that has previously been neglected in the scholarly discourse. To this end, she examines five canonical texts from the 13th century as examples of High Medieval courtly literature: Wirnts von Grafenberg ‘Wigalois’, Hartmanns von Aue ‘Gregorius’, the anonymous ‘Reinfried von Braunschweig’, Konrads von Würzburg ‘Trojanierkrieg’ and Wolframs von Eschenbach ‘Titurel’.

Events

The events of the subproject serve the exchange with other researchers, offering thematic-methodical points of contact and possibilities for networking, as well as providing a platform for discussing our own research approaches.

  • Lecture series (in cooperation with subproject B06) "Inschriftlichkeit und Bildlichkeit. Materiale und intermediale Dimensionen des Geschriebene in deutschen Texten des Mittelalters" (‘Inscriptionality and Figurativeness. Material and Intermedial Dimensions of Writing in German Medieval Literature’, October to December 2011)
    • Katharina Philipowski: Die steinerne Rede Persines. Zur Grabinschrift in Thürings von Ringoltingen »Melusine«
    • Michael Stolz: Stilus – calamus – griffel – stift. Zur Metaphorik des Stilbegriffs in der mittellateinischen und mittelhochdeutschen Literatur
    • Andreas Kraß: Der Finger Gottes. Realpräsenz in der semiotischen Theorie und Praxis des Mittelalters
    • Christoph Schanze: Textbildlichkeit. Das Wissen vom Guten und Bösen im »Welschen Gast« Thomasins von Zerklære
    • Henrike Manuwald: Bilder für Literati? Zum volkssprachigen Bild-Text im »Andachtsbüchlein aus der Sammlung Bouhier«
    • Christina Lechtermann: »Ain sunder lob hie schriben in«. In-Texte im »Marienleben« Wernhers des Schweizers
    • Mathias Herweg: Verlorene Präsenz oder: Faszinationen der Handschriftenkultur im Zeitalter des frühen Buchdrucks
    • Christian Kiening: Auratische Schrift
    • Stephan Müller: (In-)Schriften gegen den Teufel. Aspekte des Gebrauchs von Schrift und Geheimschrift in der Kultur des Mittelalters
  • Workshop on »Dinge und ihre Schriften. Poetologie und Funktion erzählter Inschriften« (‘Things and their Writing. Poetology and Functions of Narrated Inscriptions’, 6th/7th December 2012)
    • Christoph Huber: Der Apfel der Discordia und seine Inschrift
    • Elisabeth Martschini: Beständigkeit – Lebendigkeit – Vergänglichkeit. Aspekte von (In)Schriftlichkeit in höfischen Erzähltexten des 13. Jahrhunderts
    • Flavia Pantanella, M.A.: Inschriftlichkeit in Minnereden
    • Astrid Lembke: Die Liebe im Ding. Versiegelte Botschaften im »Wigalois«
  • International CRC’s authors conference (in cooperation with subproject C02) »Praktiken schriftlicher Kommunikation. Die Produktion und Rezeption von schrifttragenden Artefakten in der alttestamentlichen und mittelalterlichen Literatur« (‘Practices of Written Communication. The Production and Reception of Script-Bearing Artefacts in Old Testament and Medieval Literature’) (29th September–1st October 2014)
    • Robert Folger: Die Imagination der Materialität: Das Liebesgefängnis (»Cárcel de amor« 1492), Metatextualität und soziale Praxis
    • Konrad Schmid: Schrift und Schriftmetaphorik in der Prophetie des Jeremiabuchs
    • Reinhard Müller: Vom verschrifteten Orakelspruch zum Prophetenbuch. Schriftliche Übermittlung göttlicher Botschaften im Licht von Jes 8,1.16 und Jes 30,8
    • Friedrich-Emanuel Focken: Ezechiels Schriftrolle. Die Konzeption seiner Prophetie im Berufungsbericht (Ez 1–3)
    • Erhard Blum: Die altaramäischen Wandinschriften vom Tell Deir ʻAlla und ihr institutioneller Kontext
    • David M. Carr: Amulet Practice and Democratized Regulation of Education
    • Astrid Lembke: Schmuck und Gefängnis. Das Grabmal der Japhite in Wirnts von Grafenberg »Wigalois«
    • Katharina Philipowski: Schrift in Fesseln: Die steinerne Rede der Persine in Thürings von Ringoltingen »Melusine« (1456)
    • Daniel Stökl Ben Ezra: Bücherlesen im Jachad Qumrans: Himmlische Bücher zwischen Katechese, kollektivem Studium und esoterischer Geheimschrift
    • Andrew James Johnston: Schriftkommunikation in »Beowulf«
    • Joachim Schaper: Anthropologie des Schreibens als Theologie des Schreibens
    • Hanna Liss: Ein Pentateuch wie andere auch? Die Lese-Geheimnisse des »Regensburg Pentateuch«
    • Christina Lechtermann: Textherstellung in den Marienleben Philipps von Seitz, Walthers von Rheinau und Wernhers des Schweizer
    • Jan Christian Gertz: Mose zerbricht die Tafeln des Bundes am Sinai. Literarhistorisch ausgereizt, aber praxeologisch unterschätzt?
    • Ludger Lieb/Michael R. Ott: Schnittstellen. Mensch-Artefakt-Interaktion in deutschsprachigen Texten des 13. Jahrhunderts
  • »Graffiti. Auf- und Inschriften in sprach- und literaturwissenschaftlicher Perspektive«, (‘Graffiti. Inscriptions from a Linguistic and Literary Perspective’), Working conference of the ‘Österreichische Gesellschaft für Germanistik’, the ‘ Deutscher Germanistenverband’ and the CRC 933 (5th–7th November 2015 at the University of Paderborn)
  • Two workshops concerning »Erzählten Inschriften in europäischen Literaturen« (‘Narrated Inscriptions in European Literatures’) preparing the publication of »Writing beyond Pen and Parchment«, 15th June 2016 and 14th/15th June 2017. Participants: Nataša Bedeković, Frank Bezner, Stephen Dörr, Maria Krümpelmann, Ludger Lieb, Stephanie Lang, Tamara Ludwig, Christine Neufeld, Michael Ott, Nele Schneidereit, Sascha Schultz, Katja Schulz, Isabel Toral-Niehoff, Laura Velte, Ricarda Wagner, Christoph Witt

Project-Relevant Publications

Collected Volumes

Ricarda Wagner, Christine Neufeld u. Ludger Lieb (Hgg.): Writing beyond Pen and Parchment: Inscribed Objects in Medieval European Literature. (Materiale Textkulturen 30) Berlin/Boston 2019. [https://www.degruyter.com/view/product/524503]

Michaela Böttner, Ludger Lieb, Christian Vater u. Christian Witschel (Hgg.): 5300 Jahre Schrift. Heidelberg 2017. [https://5300jahreschrift.materiale-textkulturen.de/]

Ludger Lieb, Stephan Müller u. Doris Tophinke (Hgg): Graffiti. Deutschsprachige Auf- und Inschriften in sprach- und literaturwissenschaftlicher Perspektive. (Stimulus. Mitteilungen der Österreichischen Gesellschaft für Germanistik 24) Wien 2017.

Friedrich-Emanuel Focken, Michael R. Ott: Metatexte. Erzählungen von schrifttragenden Artefakten in der alttestamentlichen und mittelalterlichen Literatur. (Materiale Textkulturen 15) Berlin/Boston 2016. [DOI 10.1515/9783110417944]

Beate Kellner, Ludger Lieb u. Stephan Müller unter Mitarbeit von Jan Hon und Pia Selmayr (Hgg.), Höfische Textualität. Festschrift für Peter Strohschneider, Heidelberg (erscheint Oktober 2015).

Thomas Meier, Michael R. Ott u. Rebecca Sauer (Hgg.), Materiale Textkulturen. Konzepte – Materialien – Praktiken (Materiale Textkulturen 1), Berlin/München/Boston 2015 [DOI 10.1515/9783110371291].

Margreth Egidi, Ludger Lieb, Mireille Schnyder u. Moritz Wedell (Hgg.), Liebesgaben. Kommunikative, performative und poetologische Dimensionen in der Literatur des Mittelalters und der Frühen Neuzeit (Philologische Studien und Quellen 240), Berlin 2012.

Essays

Ricarda Wagner, Christine Neufeld: Introduction. In: Dies. u. Ludger Lieb (Hgg.): Writing beyond Pen and Parchment: Inscribed Objects in Medieval European Literature. (Materiale Textkulturen 30) Berlin/Boston 2019, S. 1–14. [https://www.degruyter.com/view/product/524503]

Laura Velte, Michael R. Ott: Writing Between Stillness and Movement. Script-Bearing Artefacts in Courtly German Literature. In: Ricarda Wagner, Christine Neufeld u. Ludger Lieb (Hgg.): Writing beyond Pen and Parchment: Inscribed Objects in Medieval European Literature. (Materiale Textkulturen 30) Berlin/Boston 2019, S. 17–40. [https://www.degruyter.com/view/product/524503]

Christine Neufeld, Ricarda Wagner: Inscriptions in British Literature: From Runes to the Rise of Public Poetry. In: Dies. u. Ludger Lieb (Hgg.): Writing beyond Pen and Parchment: Inscribed Objects in Medieval European Literature. (Materiale Textkulturen 30) Berlin/Boston 2019, S. 63–92. [https://www.degruyter.com/view/product/524503]

Michael R. Ott: Culture in Nature. Writing on Wood. In: Ricarda Wagner, Christine Neufeld u. Ludger Lieb (Hgg.): Writing beyond Pen and Parchment: Inscribed Objects in Medieval European Literature. (Materiale Textkulturen 30) Berlin/Boston 2019, S. 167–178. [https://www.degruyter.com/view/product/524503]

Michael R. Ott, Stephanie Béreiziat-Lang: From Tattoo to Stigma: Writing on Body and Skin. In: Ricarda Wagner, Christine Neufeld u. Ludger Lieb (Hgg.): Writing beyond Pen and Parchment: Inscribed Objects in Medieval European Literature. (Materiale Textkulturen 30) Berlin/Boston 2019, S. 193–208. [https://www.degruyter.com/view/product/524503]

Ludger Lieb: Woven Words, Embroidered Stories: Inscriptions on Textiles. In: Ricarda Wagner, Christine Neufeld u. Ludger Lieb (Hgg.): Writing beyond Pen and Parchment: Inscribed Objects in Medieval European Literature. (Materiale Textkulturen 30) Berlin/Boston 2019, S. 209–220. [https://www.degruyter.com/view/product/524503]

Christine Neufeld: Writing Spaces: Inscriptions on Architecture. In: Ricarda Wagner, dies. u. Ludger Lieb (Hgg.): Writing beyond Pen and Parchment: Inscribed Objects in Medieval European Literature. (Materiale Textkulturen 30) Berlin/Boston 2019, S. 223–238. [https://www.degruyter.com/view/product/524503]

Ricarda Wagner: Tablets and the Poetics of the Pre-Modern Post-It. In: Dies., Christine Neufeld. u. Ludger Lieb (Hgg.): Writing beyond Pen and Parchment: Inscribed Objects in Medieval European Literature. (Materiale Textkulturen 30) Berlin/Boston 2019, S. 239–254. [https://www.degruyter.com/view/product/524503]

Laura Velte: Sepulchral Representation: Inscribed Tombs and Narrated Epitaphs in the High Middle Ages. In: Ricarda Wagner, Christine Neufeld u. Ludger Lieb (Hgg.): Writing beyond Pen and Parchment: Inscribed Objects in Medieval European Literature. (Materiale Textkulturen 30) Berlin/Boston 2019, S. 255–274. [https://www.degruyter.com/view/product/524503]

Michael R. Ott: Text-Bearing Warriors: Inscriptions on Weapons. In: Ricarda Wagner, Christine Neufeld u. Ludger Lieb (Hgg.): Writing beyond Pen and Parchment: Inscribed Objects in Medieval European Literature. (Materiale Textkulturen 30) Berlin/Boston 2019, S. 275–290. [https://www.degruyter.com/view/product/524503]

Maria Krümpelmann, Ludger Lieb, Tamara Ludwig, Christine Neufeld, Michael R. Ott, Ricarda Wagner: A Cabinet of Curiosities. In: Ricarda Wagner, Christine Neufeld u. Ludger Lieb (Hgg.): Writing beyond Pen and Parchment: Inscribed Objects in Medieval European Literature. (Materiale Textkulturen 30) Berlin/Boston 2019, S. 317–332. [https://www.degruyter.com/view/product/524503]

Ludger Lieb, Verfluchte Dinge. Artefaktbiographien und Dingkarrieren in der Edda und im Nibelungenlied. [Online-Publikation 2018].

Michael R. Ott: Die höfische Welt der Dinge: Wolframs von Eschenbach Parzival. In. Susanne Scholz, Ulrike Vedder (Hgg.): Handbuch Literatur & Materielle Kultur. (Handbücher zur kulturwissenschaftlichen Philologie 6) Berlin/Boston 2018, S. 163–171. 

Michael R. Ott: Erzählte Bauminschriften zwischen Antike und Früher Neuzeit. In: Ludger Lieb, Stephan Müller u. Doris Tophinke (Hgg.): Graffiti. Deutschsprachige Auf- und Inschriften in sprach- und literaturwissenschaftlicher Perspektive. (Stimulus. Mitteilungen der Österreichischen Gesellschaft für Germanistik 24) Wien 2017, S. 23–39.

Ludger Lieb u. Ricarda Wagner, Dead Writing Matters? Materiality and Presence in Medieval Narrations of Epitaphs. In: Irene Berti, Katharina Bolle, Fanny Opdenhoff u. Fabian Stroth (Hgg.), Writing Matters: Presenting and Perceiving Monumental Texts in Ancient Mediterranean Culture, Berlin/München/Boston (Materiale Textkulturen 14) (erscheint 2016).

 

Ludger Lieb, Michael R. Ott: Schnittstellen. Mensch-Artefakt-Interaktion in deutschsprachigen Texten des 13. Jahrhunderts. In: Friedrich-Emanuel Focken/Michael R. Ott (Hrsg.): Metatexte. Erzählungen von schrifttragenden Artefakten in der alttestamentlichen und mittelalterlichen Literatur. (Materiale Textkulturen 15) Berlin/Boston 2016, S. 265-279. [DOI 10.1515/9783110417944-014]

Ludger Lieb, Spuren materialer Textkulturen. Neun Thesen zur höfischen Textualität im Spiegel text-immanenter Inschriften. In: Beate Kellner, Ludger Lieb und Stephan Müller unter Mitarbeit von Jan Hon und Pia Selmayr (Hgg.), Höfische Textualität. Festschrift für Peter Strohschneider, Heidelberg 2015, S. 1–20 (erscheint Oktober 2015).

Ludger Lieb u. Michael R. Ott, Schrift-Träger. Mobile Inschriften in der deutschsprachigen Literatur des Mittelalters. In: Schriftträger – Textträger. Zur materialen Präsenz des Geschriebenen in frühen Gesellschaften. Hg. von Annette Kehnel und Diamantis Panagiotopoulos (Materiale Textkulturen 6), Berlin/München/Boston 2015, S. 17–38. [DOI 10.1515/9783110371345.15]

Michael R. Ott, Rot auf weiß. Geschlechterkonstellationen, Taktiken und Strategien im Meisterlied von »Albertus Magnus und der Tochter des Königs von Frankreich«. Publiziert am 06.08.2015. [URL] [urn:nbn:de:bsz:16-heidok-191650]

Michael R. Ott, Die Tafel des Gregorius als schrifttragendes Artefakt. In: Zeitschrift für Germanistik 25 (2015), S. 253–267.

Michael R. Ott u. Flavia Pantanella, Geschriebenes erzählen. Erzählte Inschriften in Minnereden aus narrativer, poetologischer und materialer Perspektive. In: Iulia-Emilia Dorobanţu, Jacob Klingner u. Ludger Lieb (Hgg.), Zwischen Anthropologie und Philologie. Beiträge zur Zukunft der Minneredenforschung, Heidelberg 2014, 329–362. [URL]

Michael R. Ott, Philologie der Worte und Sachen. Friedrich Panzers Inschriftenforschung als disziplinäre Herausforderung. In: Deutsche Vierteljahrsschrift für Literaturwissenschaft und Geistesgeschichte (DVjs) 88 (2014), S. 234–255.

Michael R. Ott, Die Erfindung des Paratextes – Überlegungen zur frühneuzeitlichen Textualität. Publiziert am 06.08.2010. [URL] [urn:nbn:de:hebis:30-78139]

Ludger Lieb, Kann denn Schenken Sünde sein? Liebesgaben in Literatur und Kunst von Ovid bis zum Gothaer Liebespaar (um 1480). In: Geist und Geld. Hg. von Annette Kehnel (Wirtschaft und Kultur im Gespräch 1), Frankfurt a. M. 2009, S. 185–218.

Ludger Lieb, Minne schreiben. Schriftmetaphorik und Schriftpraxis in den ›Minnereden‹ des späten Mittelalters. In: Schrift und Liebe in der Kultur des Mittelalters. [Kolloquium Konstanz Oktober 2005]. Hg. von Mireille Schnyder (Trends in Medieval Philology 13), Berlin/New York 2008, S. 191–220.

Contributions and Articles

Ludger Lieb: Schrift auf fantastischen Gräbern im Mittelalter. Eine kafkaeske Lektüre (um 1260). In: Michaela Böttner et al. (Hgg.), 5300 Jahre Schrift. Heidelberg: Wunderhorn 2017, S. 106–109. [https://5300jahreschrift.materiale-textkulturen.de/]

Ludger Lieb: Textkulturen. Neuer Blick auf alte Schriften. In: Die Magie der Schrift – Spektrum der Wissenschaft Spezial Archäologie – Geschichte – Kultur 3 (2016), S. 6–13.

Ludger Lieb: Imagination. Buchstaben, Begehren und Tod. In: Die Magie der Schrift – Spektrum der Wissenschaft Spezial Archäologie – Geschichte – Kultur 3 (2016), S. 78–81.

Ludger Lieb u. Markus Hilgert, Entstehung und Entwicklung des Heidelberger SFB 933. In: Materiale Textkulturen. Konzepte – Materialien – Praktiken. Hg. von Thomas Meier, Michael R. Ott und Rebecca Sauer (Materiale Textkulturen 1), Berlin/München/Boston 2015, S. 7–16. [DOI 10.1515/9783110371291.7]

Michael R. Ott, Mitarbeit an den Artikeln »Material«, »Kontext«, »Geschriebenes«, »Textkulturen«, »Wachs«, »Holz«, »Naturmaterialien«, »Menschenhaut«, »Textilien«, »Gießen«, »Lesen und Entziffern«. In: Materiale Textkulturen. Konzepte – Materialien – Praktiken (Materiale Textkulturen 1), Berlin/München/Boston 2015. [DOI 10.1515/9783110371291]

Michael R. Ott, Literaturwissenschaft per Suchmaschine. Auf der Suche nach fiktionalen Inschriften mit der »Mittelhochdeutschen Begriffsdatenbank«, Material Text Culture Blog 2013.5. [pdf]

Astrid Lembke u. Ludger Lieb, Magie der Inschrift. Die sinnliche Art der Informationsübermittlung. In: Forschungsmagazin der Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg 1/2012, S. 20–27. [link (Stand 03.09.2015)]

Ludger Lieb, Panzer, Friedrich (Wilhelm). In: Enzyklopädie des Märchens 10 (2002), Sp. 517–520.

Database

https://inschriftlichkeit.materiale-textkulturen.de/index.php

Video

Interview with Dr. Michael R. Ott (October 23rd 2013), https://www.materiale-textkulturen.de/video01.php?v=1

 

Subprojects of the 3rd Funding Period

A01 A02 A03 A05 A06 A08 A09 A10 A11 A12 B01 B04 B09 B10 B13 B14 B15 C05 C07 C08 C09 C10 INF Ö2 Z

 

 

Completed Subprojects

A01 A03 A04 B02 B03 B06 B07 B11 B12 C01 C02 C03 C04 C06 IGK Ö1

 

 

Members of the CRC

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